Monday: Virtual conference

Program information will be updated regularly until the start of AutomotiveUI 2020.

03:00 - 04:00 AM EDT
Workshop 1 Part A

04:00 - 05:00 AM EDT
Workshop 1 Part B

Organizers:
Nikolas Martelaro, Carnegie Mellon University
Wendy Ju, Cornell Tech

Max Participants:
30 FULL

Primary Contact:
nikmart@cmu.edu

What Could Go Wrong? Promoting Discussion on the Potential Downsides of Autonomous Vehicles

Description:
While autonomous vehicles have the potential to greatly improve our daily lives, there are also challenges and potential downsides to these systems. In this workshop, we intend to foster discussions about the potential negative aspects of autonomous cars, in hopes of surfacing challenges that should be considered during the design process rather than after deployment. We will spur these conversations through short talks and through group discussion facilitated by a card game called "What Could Go Wrong?'' Our goal is to consider the autonomous vehicle's benefits---improving safety, increasing mobility, reducing emissions---against potential drawbacks. By identifying potential harms and downsides, the workshop attendees and the AutoUI community more broadly can design more complete and well-considered solutions.

Workshop Website :
https://augmented-design-capability-studio.github.io/what-could-go-wrong/


05:00 - 06:00 AM EDT
Full Paper Presentation 1

Moderator:
Chris Janssen
Jingyi Li

Advanced Interfaces, Automation and User Experiences

Investigating the Effect of Tactile Input and Output Locations for Drivers' Hands on In-car Tasks Performance
Dong-Bach Vo, Stephen Brewster

HM award How Long Can a Driver Look? Exploring Time Thresholds to Evaluate Head-up Display Imagery
Bethan Hannah Topliss, Catherine Harvey, Gary Burnett

A Wizard of Oz Field Study to Understand Non-Driving-Related Activities, Trust, and Acceptance of Automated Vehicles
Henrik Detjen, Bastian Pfleging, Stefan Schneegass

Sick of Scents: Investigating Non-invasive Olfactory Motion Sickness Mitigation in Automated Driving
Clemens Schartmüller, Andreas Riener


06:00 - 07:00 AM EDT
WiP Poster ‘Live Chat’ 1 

01. "Give Me the Keys, I’ll Drive!" Results from an Exploratory Interview Study to assess Public’s Desires and Concerns on Automated Valet Parking
Martina Schuß, Andreas Riener

03. An Exploration of Users' Thoughts on Rear-Seat Productivity in Virtual Reality
Jingyi Li, Ceenu George, Andrea Ngao, Kai Holländer, Stefan Mayer, Andreas Butz

04. User Requirements for Remote Teleoperation-based Interfaces
Gaetano Graf, Heinrich Hussmann

05. Ultrahapticons: “Haptifying” Drivers’ Mental Models to Transform Automotive Mid-Air Haptic Gesture Infotainment Interfaces
Eddie Brown, David R. Large, Hannah Limerick, Gary Burnett

07. Requirements of Future Control Centers in Public Transport
Carmen Kettwich, Annika Dreßler

09. Adapting In-Vehicle Voice Output: A User- and Situation-Adaptive Approach
Daniela Stier, Ulrich Heid, Wolfgang Minker

12. "Help, Accident Ahead!" Using Mixed Reality Environments in Automated Vehicles to Support Occupants After Passive Accident Experiences
Henrik Detjen, Stefan Geisler, Stefan Schneegass

13. Designing the Interaction of Highly Automated Vehicles with Cyclists in Urban Longitudinal Traffic. Relevant Use Cases and Methodical Considerations
Nicole Fritz, Fanny Kobiela, Dietrich Manstetten, Andreas Korthauer, Klaus Bengler

14. "What is it?" How to Collect Urgent Utterances using a Gamification Approach
Jakob Landesberger, Ute Ehrlich, Wolfgang Minker

16. Assessing the Use of Physiological Signals and Facial Behaviour to Gauge Drivers' Emotions as a UX Metric in Automotive User Studies
Christine Spencer, Chihiro Suga, Ibrahim Alper Koc, Alexander Lee, Anupama Mahesh Dhareshwar, Elin Franzén, Maria Iozzo, Gawain Morrison, Gary McKeown

17. No Need to Slow Down! A Head-up Display Based Warning System for Cyclists for Safe Passage of Parked Vehicles
Tamara von Sawitzky, Thomas Grauschopf, Andreas Riener

18. Crosswalk Cooperation: A Phone-Integrated Driver-Vehicle Cooperation Approach to Predict the Crossing Intentions of Pedestrians in Automated Driving
Marcel Walch, Stacey Li, Ilan Mandel, David Goedicke, Natalie Friedman, Wendy Ju

10:00 - 11:00 AM EDT
Opening Plenary Session 

Moderator:
Dr. David Yang
AAA Foundation for Traffic Safety 

Sponsored by 

Innovations for All Road Users


Dr. Natasha Merat
University of Leeds

Professor Merat is an experimental psychologist and research group leader of the Human Factors and Safety Group, @ITS, University of Leeds. Her main research involves understanding the interaction of road users with new technologies. She applies this interest to studying factors such as driver distraction and driver impairment, and she is an expert in studying the human factors implications of highly automated vehicles. Dr Merat is Chair of the TRB sub-committee on Human Factors in Road Vehicle Automation, and has appointments as expert advisor to the European Commission, Zenzic and Veoneer Inc. 


Dr. Peter Burns
Transport Canada

Dr. Peter C. Burns is Chief of the Human Factors and Crash Avoidance division at Transport Canada. His division develops test methods and conducts applied research on human factors and the safety performance of vehicle systems. Part of his research program is currently examining the risks of interaction with automation, driver monitoring, test methods, interface design and the importance of appropriate trust in automation. Peter has 30 years of experience in the field of human factors and road safety research.

Dr. John Lenneman
Toyota Collaborative Safety Research Center 

Dr. John Lenneman is a Senior Principal Engineer in Toyota’s Collaborative Safety Research Center (CSRC), based in Ann Arbor, Michigan. He is responsible for the execution of R&D projects in the area of Human-Technology Integration (HTI), which includes the development of HTI research strategy, publishing and presenting findings, and integrating findings into product development. John earned a Ph.D. in Applied Experimental Psychology from Central Michigan University and a Master of Science in Industrial Engineering from the University of Michigan

11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EDT
Full Paper Presentation 2

Moderator:
Alexandra Bremers
Wayne Giang

Vehicle Automation: Trust and Takeovers

HM award Situational Trust Scale for Automated Driving (STS-AD): Development and Initial Validation
Brittany E. Holthausen, Philipp Wintersberger, Bruce N. Walker, Andreas Riener

Effects of Anger and Display Urgency on Takeover Performance in Semi-automated Vehicles
Harsh Kamalesh Sanghavi, Yiqi Zhang, Myounghoon Jeon

Driver-initiated Tesla Autopilot Disengagements in Naturalistic Driving
Alberto Morando, Pnina Gershon, Bruce Mehler, Bryan Reimer

Evaluating Effects of Cognitive Load, Takeover Request Lead Time, and Traffic Density on Drivers’ Takeover Performance in Conditionally Automated Driving
Na Du, Jinyong Kim, Feng Zhou, Elizabeth Pulver, Dawn Tilbury, Lionel Peter Robert, Anuj Pradhan,X. Jessie Yang


12:00 - 13:00 PM EDT
Workshop 2 Part A

Organizers:
Deike Albers, Technical University of Munich
Niklas Grabbe, Technical University of Munich
Dominik Janetzko, Technical University of Munich
Klaus Bengler, Technical University of Munich

Max Participants:
40 FULL

Primary Contact:
deike.albers@tum.de

Saluton! How do you evaluate usability? - Virtual Workshop on Usability Assessments of Automated Driving Systems

Description:
The usability of human-machine-interfaces (HMIs) for automated driving systems (ADS) gains importance with the imminent introduction of SAE L3 automated vehicles. Assuming global proliferation of automated vehicles, a common understanding of usability for ADS HMIs and its application in research and industry is indispensable. In reference to ISO 9241-11, this virtual workshop aims to identify potential differences in the understanding and the resulting assessment of usability. The international audience of the Automotive-UI poses an ideal setting for this purpose by bringing together academics and practitioners in the domain of automotive user-interfaces. The experimental design for an international usability study serves as an illustrative case example for the discussion. Participants learn about methods, challenges and current research on international evaluations of automotive user interfaces. The workshop’s goal is to jointly derive a consensus for the theoretical and practical interpretation of the term usability in the context of HMIs for automated driving.


13:00 - 14:00 PM EDT
WiP Poster ‘Live Chat’ 2 

02. Hit the Brakes! Augmented Reality Head-up Display Impact on Driver Responses to Unexpected Events
Missie Smith, Lisa Jordan, Kiran Bagalkotkar, Srikar S. Manjuluri, Rishikesh Nittala, Joseph L. Gabbard

04. User Requirements for Remote Teleoperation-based Interfaces
Gaetano Graf, Heinrich Hussmann

06. Decoding CNN based Object Classifier Using Visualization
Abhishek Mukhopadhyay, Imon Mukherjee, Pradipta Biswas

07. Requirements of Future Control Centers in Public Transport
Carmen Kettwich, Annika Dreßler

08. Towards A Framework of Detecting Mode Confusion in Automated Driving: Examples of Data from Older Drivers
Shabnam Haghzare, Jennifer Campos, Alex Mihailidis

10. Toward Minimum Startle After Take-Over Request: A Preliminary Study of Physiological Data
Erfan Pakdamanian

13. Designing the Interaction of Highly Automated Vehicles with Cyclists in Urban Longitudinal Traffic. Relevant Use Cases and Methodical Considerations
Nicole Fritz, Fanny Kobiela, Dietrich Manstetten, Andreas Korthauer, Klaus Bengler

15. Addressing Rogue Vehicles by Integrating Computer Vision, Activity Monitoring, and Contextual Information
Brook Abegaz, Eric Chan-Tin, Neil Klingensmith, George K. Thiruvathukal

16. Assessing the Use of Physiological Signals and Facial Behaviour to Gauge Drivers' Emotions as a UX Metric in Automotive User Studies
Christine Spencer, Chihiro Suga, Ibrahim Alper Koc, Alexander Lee, Anupama Mahesh Dhareshwar, Elin Franzén, Maria Iozzo, Gawain Morrison, Gary McKeown

18. Crosswalk Cooperation: A Phone-Integrated Driver-Vehicle Cooperation Approach to Predict the Crossing Intentions of Pedestrians in Automated Driving
Marcel Walch, Stacey Li, Ilan Mandel, David Goedicke, Natalie Friedman, Wendy Ju

21. Foresight Safety: Sharing Drivers’ State among Connected Road Users
Paolo Pretto, Sandra Trösterer, Nikolai Ebinger, Nino Dum

23. VR-PAVIB: The Virtual Reality Pedestrian-Autonomous Vehicle Interaction Benchmark
Ana Dalipi, Dongfang Liu, Xiaolei Guo, Yingjie Victor Chen, Christos Mousas

25. Tactical Decisions for Lane Changes or Lane Following? Development of a Study Design for Automated Driving
Johannes Ossig, Stephanie Cramer


14:00 - 15:00 PM EDT
Workshop 3 Part A

15:00 - 16:00 PM EDT
Workshop 3 Part B

Organizers:
Zoe M Becerra, Georgia Institute of Technology
Nadia Fereydooni, Georgia Institute of Technology
Stephen Brewster, University of Glasgow
Andrew L Kun, University of New Hampshire
Angus McKerral, University of Newcastle
Bruce N. Walker, Georgia Institute of Technology

Max Participants:
30 FULL

Workshop on Virtual Reality (VR) in Automated Vehicles: Developing and Evaluating Metrics to Assess VR in the Car

Description:
As automated systems continue to be integrated in everyday vehicles, drivers have an opportunity to engage in non-driving related tasks (NDRTs) while the automation is responsible for the driving task. However, current research on NDRTs is limited and has not explored the use of virtual reality (VR) in an automated vehicle. To understand how this technology may be implemented in this environment, it is critical to investigate related constructs like situation awareness, perceived risk, or presence. However, current measures for these constructs are not suitable for use in VR. This workshop aims to address this gap bringing together researchers to begin the development of new measures for these constructs. Creating new measures is the first step toward effectively and accurately assessing the use of VR in the automated vehicle context.


21:00 - 22:00 PM EDT
Full Paper Presentation 3

Moderator:
Seulchan Lee
Ronald Schroeter

External Displays, Ride Sharing and Individual Differences 

Designing External Automotive Displays: VR Prototypes and Analysis
Ashratuz Zavin Asha, Fahim Anzum, Patrick Finn, Ehud Sharlin, Mario Costa Sousa

Capturing Passenger Experience in a Ride-Sharing Autonomous Vehicle: The Role of Digital Assistants in User Interface Design
Benjamin S. Alpers, Kali Cornn, Lauren E. Feitzinger, Usman Khaliq, So Yeon Park, Bardia Beigi, Daniel Joseph Hills-Bunnell, Trevor Hyman, Kaustubh Deshpande, Rieko Yajima, Larry Leifer, Lauren Aquino Shluzas

Sound Decisions: How Synthetic Motor Sounds Improve Autonomous Vehicle-Pedestrian Interactions
Dylan James Moore, Rebecca Currano, David Sirkin

What Driving Says About You: A Small-Sample Exploratory Study Between Personality and Self-Reported Driving Style Among Young Male Drivers
Xingwei Wu, Yuki Gorospe, Teruhisa Misu, Y Huynh, Nimsi Guerrero

22:00 - 23:00 PM EDT
Workshop 4 - Part A

Organizers:
Seul Chan Lee, Gyeongsang National University
Kristina Stojmenova, University of Ljubljana
Gowdham Prabhakar, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore
Shan Bao, University of Michigan
Jaka Sodnik, University of Ljubljana
Myounghoon Jeon, Virginia Tech

Max Participants:
30 few spots left

Primary Contact:
seulchan@gnu.ac.kr

The 2nd Workshop on Localization vs. Internationalization: Impact of COVID-19 Pandemic on AutomotiveUI Activities from the View of Diversity and Inclusion

Description:
A worldwide pandemic has brought many challenges in numerous areas of everyone’s life. The AutomotiveUI 2020 has also been moved to a virtual conference. Although the situation seems to be improving in some parts of the world, the impacts that the pandemic has brought to the research and academia may last long even after the pandemic is over. In the automotive UI community, there is more than one aspect that should be taken into consideration. Ironically, the situation brought about both risks and opportunities including research methods, collaboration, interaction manners, and diversity and inclusion. With this background, the goal of this workshop is to discuss the impact of the COVID19 pandemic on the automotive UI community from the perspective of the diversity and inclusion and to discuss the direction of collaborative activities of our community with researchers from various groups. We will organize two 1-hour sessions across both days in one time zone. The workshop schedule will begin with an introduction to the topics. On the second day, a brief summary of the discussion of the previous day will be also presented. Some guest speakers from different backgrounds will be invited to present topics of interest. They will provide presentations with the PechaKucha style. After the invited presentations, a group discussion will be conducted to discuss the research questions. We will designate one or two topics to discuss for each group.

Workshop Website :
https://sites.google.com/view/autoui20-workshop/home


23:00 - 24:00 PM EDT
Workshop 5

Organizers:
Chihab Nadri, Virginia Tech
Jingyi Li, LMU Munich
Esther Bosch, German Aerospace Center (DLR)
Michael Oehl, German Aerospace Center (DLR)
Ignacio Alvarez, Intel Labs
Michael Braun, BMW Group Research
Myounghoon Jeon, Virginia Tech

Max Participants:
18 FULL

Primary Contact:
cnadri@vt.edu

Emotion GaRage Vol. II: A Workshop on Affective In-Vehicle Display Design

Description:
Driver performance and behavior can be partially predicated based on one’s emotional state. Through ascertaining the emotional state of passengers and employing various mitigation strategies, empathic cars can show potential in improving user experience and driving performance. Challenges remain in the implementation of such strategies, as individual differences play a large role in mediating the effect of affective intervention. Therefore, we propose a workshop that aims to bring together researchers and practitioners interested in affective interfaces and in-vehicle technologies as a forum for the development of targeted emotion intervention methods. During the workshop, we will focus on a common set of use cases and generate approaches that can suit different user groups. By the end of this short workshop, researchers will determine ideal intervention methods for prospective user groups. This will be achieved through the method of insight combination to generate and discuss ideas.